Welcome

to the British Ecological Society – Tropical Ecology Group Blog

 

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Welcome to our site! Here, we bring together events, opportunities,  topical blog articles and interviews for the tropical ecology research community. The aim of the BES Tropical Ecology Special Interest Group (TEG) is to promote and facilitate communication and interaction between tropical ecologists to enable:

  • Transfer and development of knowledge and skills
  • Inter-disciplinary research activities
  • Communication with practitioners and policy
  • Support for early career researchers

Please join us on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, or sign up to our mailing list here for news and updates! On our blog page, you can also sign up for emails whenever we publish a new post, so you never need to miss out.

Please get in touch via our contact page or email us (tropical@britishecologicalsociety.org) if you would like to contribute blog content or develop a new event. Events can be proposed at any time but funding will be considered in October for the following year.

Committee Members

Christopher Chandler @chrisjchandler is an early career rep of the BES Tropical Ecology Group. He is broadly interested in the dynamics of carbon and biodiversity in tropical forests and how the ecology of these ecosystems may change in response to global environmental change. Currently a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, he is researching lianas (woody vines) and the impact they have on the ability of tropical forests to sequester and store carbon. You can learn more about his research here http://www.envision-dtp.org/people/cohort_3_2016/002903/chris-chandler

Co-chair: Christopher Chandler (@chrisjchandler) is broadly interested in the dynamics of carbon and biodiversity in tropical forests and how the ecology of these ecosystems may change in response to global environmental change. Currently a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, he is researching lianas (woody vines) and the impact they have on the ability of tropical forests to sequester and store carbon. You can learn more about his research here.

Work photoCo-chair: Stephanie Martin (@forestladysteph) is a science communicator who predominantly works in editing and writing. She has a Masters in Tropical Forest Ecology and continues to focus her efforts on the conservation of tropical rainforest systems. 

 

 

Robin


Social Media (Twitter):
Robin Hayward is a PhD student at the University of Stirling & Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, looking at the ways in which tropical rain forests recover following selective logging of valuable timber species.

 

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Social Media (Facebook): Choon-Wha Fuller has been involved with the British Ecological Society for a few years now, by first attending the Undergraduate summer school, and since helping out at the Annual General Meetings. She gained experience in tropical aquatic ecology during her BSc degree Zoology and is currently working towards an MSc in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation. Her particular interests are conservation and restoration ecology as well as invasive species.

Jorge Ari Noriega

Newsletter Editor: Jorge Ari Noriega is a community ecologist working in functional ecology in the Tropics. He uses dung beetles as an indicator tool to quantify ecosystem services and environmental impact caused by humans.

 

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Website manager/editor: Eleanor Warren-Thomas
is a  NERC-IIASA Research Fellow interested in trade-offs in biodiversity and environmental conservation. She works on land use models and forest restoration, tropical peatlands in Sumatra, and did her PhD on the effect of rubber plantations on biodiversity in Southeast Asia, using economic and ecological perspectives. She’s also worked in Peru, Honduras and China.

Amelia - BES 2.jpgBlog/InFocus Editor: Amelia McKinlay is predominantly interested in the impacts of climate change on tropical forest ecosystems with particular focus on carbon dynamics. Currently, she is studying for an MRes in Tropical Forest Ecology at Imperial College London. She recently returned from a research trip to Malaysian Borneo and is investigating the influence of climate change on forest dynamics and carbon stocks using a forest gap model.

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Blog/InFocus Editor: Laura Braunholtz is a PhD student at Newcastle University, studying how road infrastructure affects tropical forest structure and mammal communities. She is interested in using novel fieldwork and modelling techniques to understand how human disturbance changes ecological communities, and the wider scale/longer term impacts this might have.

 

 

See also: https://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/membership-community/special-interest-groups/tropical-ecology

Recent Posts

From Clueless to Co-author: A Coral Ecologist’s Amazon Adventure

by Kelsey Archer Barnhill, a first-year PhD student in the Changing Oceans Research Group at University of Edinburgh. Kelsey is a coral ecologist who recently had a paper published in the Brazilian Journal of Botany titled ‘Morphological and allometric variation due to percentage of cover in Eichhornia azurea (Swart) Kunth (Pontederiaceae).’ This is the story … Continue reading From Clueless to Co-author: A Coral Ecologist’s Amazon Adventure

Investigating Trophic Cascades in the Tropics

by Emma Mackintosh, who recently completed an MRes in Tropical Forest Ecology at Imperial College London, and who will be starting her PhD at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia, on ‘Investigating the relationship between liana abundance and Australian Rainforest Recovery’ in January 2020. After fighting my way though vines and thorns in … Continue reading Investigating Trophic Cascades in the Tropics

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