Welcome

Welcome to British Ecological Society – Tropical Ecology Group Blog!

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Here, we bring together news, events, opportunities and articles of interest for the tropical ecology research community. Please join us on Twitter or Facebook, or sign up to our mailing list here for news and updates!

The aim of the BES Tropical Ecology Special Interest Group (TEG) is to promote and facilitate communication and interaction between tropical ecologists to enable:

  • Transfer and development of knowledge and skills
  • Inter-disciplinary research activities
  • Communication with practitioners and policy
  • Support for early career researchers

Please get in touch via our contact page or e-mail address if you would like to contribute blog content or develop a new event. Events can be proposed at any time but funding will be considered in October for the following year.

Committee Members

Christopher Chandler @chrisjchandler is an early career rep of the BES Tropical Ecology Group. He is broadly interested in the dynamics of carbon and biodiversity in tropical forests and how the ecology of these ecosystems may change in response to global environmental change. Currently a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, he is researching lianas (woody vines) and the impact they have on the ability of tropical forests to sequester and store carbon. You can learn more about his research here http://www.envision-dtp.org/people/cohort_3_2016/002903/chris-chandler

Co-chair: Christopher Chandler (@chrisjchandler) is an early career rep of the BES Tropical Ecology Group. He is broadly interested in the dynamics of carbon and biodiversity in tropical forests and how the ecology of these ecosystems may change in response to global environmental change. Currently a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, he is researching lianas (woody vines) and the impact they have on the ability of tropical forests to sequester and store carbon. You can learn more about his research here.

Co-chair: Stephanie Martin (@forestladysteph) Her interests are predominantly focused on tropical plant ecology and taxonomy as well as the impacts of climate change on tropical rainforest ecosystems. She is currently an MRes student on the Tropical Forest Ecology course at Imperial College London, investigating the effects of simulated drought conditions on the physiology of trees and lianas in the tropical rainforests of Australia. She is also active in science communications as a journalist, editor, presenter, and photographer.

aisha

Head Social Media: Aisyah Faruk is from Malaysia, which is also where she conducted field work for her PhD, studying the impacts of oil palm agriculture on tropical amphibians. She has extensive field experience in Southeast Asia, mainly in her home country and Indonesia. Currently, her role is mainly coordinating seed collecting projects across the Caucasus, as part of the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership managed by the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.

Robin


Social Media (Twitter):
Robin Hayward is a PhD student at the University of Stirling & Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, looking at the ways in which tropical rain forests recover following selective logging of valuable timber species.

 

Choon-Wa 2

Social Media (Facebook): Choon-Wha Fuller has been involved with the British Ecological Society for a few years now, by first attending the Undergraduate summer school, and since helping out at the Annual General Meetings. She gained experience in tropical aquatic ecology during her BSc degree Zoology and is currently working towards an MSc in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation. Her particular interests are conservation and restoration ecology as well as invasive species.

Daniel Turner


Newsletter Editor: Daniel Turner
is a PhD student at the University of Southampton. He is interested in tropical ecology, ecosystem function and how land-use change may alter these processes. Exploring these themes has resulted in research projects in Seychelles and Madagascar studying the consequences of forest conversion on ecological communities spanning invertebrates, reptiles and birds.

Jorge Ari Noriega
Newsletter Editor:
Jorge Ari Noriega is a community ecologist working in functional ecology in the Tropics. He uses dung beetles as an indicator tool to quantify ecosystem services and environmental impact caused by humans.

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Webmaster: Eleanor Warren-Thomas is a research scientist interested in trade-offs involved in biodiversity and environmental conservation.  She is currently working as post-doctoral research associate with Professor Jane Hill at the University of York studying tropical peatlands in Sumatra, and did her PhD research with Professors Paul Dolman and David Edwards at the University of East Anglia UK, focussed on the effect of rubber plantations on biodiversity in Southeast Asia, using economic and ecological perspectives.

Amelia - BES 2.jpgBlog/InFocus Editor: Amelia McKinlay is predominantly interested in the impacts of climate change on tropical forest ecosystems with particular focus on carbon dynamics. Currently, she is studying for an MRes in Tropical Forest Ecology at Imperial College London. She recently returned from a research trip to Malaysian Borneo and is investigating the influence of climate change on forest dynamics and carbon stocks using a forest gap model.

See also: https://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/membership-community/special-interest-groups/tropical-ecology/

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Recent Posts

Managing logged forests after the chainsaws have gone silent

by Gianluca Cerullo Our hunger for tropical timber has caused vast expanses of rainforest to be selectively logged, with their largest and most valuable trees chain-sawed down. For decades, conservationists have tried to reduce the impact of such logging on rainforest wildlife and structure. They have fought tooth and nail to limit the construction of … Continue reading Managing logged forests after the chainsaws have gone silent

Drought-induced Amazonian wildfires instigate a decadal-scale disruption of forest carbon dynamics

By Camila V.J. Silva I always remember an impressive image when I first stepped in a fire-disturbed humid forest: giant trees standing dead. That scene was choking and also scaring as I walked nearby those trees. In contrast to the massive disturbance caused, the ability of these forests to regenerate its understorey up to 5 … Continue reading Drought-induced Amazonian wildfires instigate a decadal-scale disruption of forest carbon dynamics

Taking the temperature of a tree – not all leaves are equal

Leaf temperatures are not the same as air temperatures, and they vary between tree species. I knew this from reading about biophysics, but the extent to which it is true only became apparent after actually going and measuring leaf temperatures myself. I measured leaf temperatures reaching 18 ºC above air temperatures, and found large effects of the distinct leaf physiology of different species.

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